Watch Me Dump A 375-Pound Squat!

by tffitness on September 13, 2016

img_3932On Monday I was gearing up to do some heavy singles on squats, and something weird happened (see video below):

I worked up to a 365 single which felt just like every other heavy low-bar squat I’ve ever done — maybe even better actually — so I loaded the bar to 275 with the idea of doing 10 pound jumps to a weight that I could repeat for 3 separate singles.

As I started descending with 375, I was thinking to myself “wow, this is feeling better than 365!” when out of nowhere, I felt a pop near my right knee, followed by an immediate collapse of my right leg. Which marks the second time that particular power rack literally saved my life 😉

As I cautiously got back to my feet, I was amazed to see that nothing seemed to have ruptured — I was sure that my leg would turn black and blue any second, but it never happened. Perhaps more amazingly, I was able to do a bodyweight squat with minimal pain a few minutes after I dumped the squat.

Today (one week later) I was able to do a set of deficit pulls with 315 and some light squatting (115 on a safety bar was hurting a bit so I backed off)

Turns out that I strained/tore one of my right adductor muscles. If you re-watch the video and look carefully at my right inner thigh, you’ll see something “jump” under my skin right before my leg buckled. Believe it or not though, this didn’t hurt at all. Strange, right?

No bruising at all, and no pain just walking around, etc. I’m expecting a full recovery in 4-6 weeks.

Here are my 4 take-home lessons from this event:

1)    Don’t EVER squat anything significant without the safety afforded by a power rack. I’d actually been doing heavy high bar squats from uprights lately (i.e., no rack) but I wont be doing that anymore.

2)    Lifting injuries don’t necessarily mean you were doing something wrong technically. Some lifters use bad form for decades with to apparent harm, while others get hurt using impeccable form. At the end of the day, injury happens (and thank you Dr. Stu McGill for this great definition) when an external load exceeds a tissue’s ability to withstand it. Although using good form lessens the overall risk, these conditions can exist within the context of both good and bad technique.

3)    If I do the powerlifting meet that I had planned for October, I won’t be squatting. If this had happened in a meet, I’d have been seriously injured (there’s no way spotters would have caught that in time), and I’m not interested in taking that type of risk. I’ll keep you posted.

4)    It’s important for me to quickly regroup and formulate a post-injury training strategy. This mostly boils down to taking advantage of the time and energy I won’t be spending on heavy squats and deads, and redirecting those resources toward other (and ideally weaker) muscles and/or training elements that could use some extra attention. For me that probably means calves, cardio, and mobility work.

Train smart, be safe, and realize that there is an inherent risk in this activity that we all love. I’ve been quite fortunate over the years in that I’ve never really had a significant acute injury, and overall, I have very little in the way or orthopedic issues despite consistent lifting over more than 2 decades now.

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If you have an injury experience (and even better, something that can be learned from it) please share in the comments section below. Now on to this week’s training (the parts of it that went well in other words):

This Week’s Training

Highlights:

• 365 Low Bar Squat

Well I’ve already covered the most significant event of the week I suppose haven’t I? Aside from that, I did manage two hard upper body sessions and one (predictably) minimal lower body workout. I will say that I’m making friends with the close grip bench press, which is now nearly as strong as my conventional grip.

As always, thanks for stopping by, and I thought I’d remind you that we’d love to have you on our mailing list — the sign-up box is on the upper-right hand side of this page. Once you’re on the list, I’ll be able to notify you of any updates, new articles, seminar dates, products, etc.

Monday, September 5, 2016

Bodyweight: 198.6 Pounds

Low Bar Squat

Set 1: 45 lb × 8

Set 2: 95 lb × 6

Set 3: 135 lb × 5

Set 4: 185 lb × 3

Set 5: 225 lb × 3

Set 6: 275 lb × 1

Set 7: 315 lb × 1

Set 8: 350 lb × 1

Set 9: 365 lb × 1

Set 10: 375 lb × 0

Notes: Strained right adductor on 375 and dumped the barbell

Deadlift

Set 1: 95 lb × 5

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Bodyweight: 197.6 Pounds

Rusin Shoulder Warm Up

Set 1: 1 lb × 10

Set 2: 1 lb × 10

Set 3: 1 lb × 10

Paused Competition Bench Press

Set 1: 45 lb × 10

Set 2: 95 lb × 8

Set 3: 135 lb × 6

Set 4: 165 lb × 4

Set 5: 185 lb × 3

Set 6: 205 lb × 1

Set 7: 225 lb × 1

Set 8: 225 lb × 1

Set 9: 225 lb × 1

Set 10: 225 lb × 1

Set 11: 205 lb × 5

Set 12: 205 lb × 5

Notes: Very minimal left shoulder pain

Military Press

Set 1: 45 lb × 10

Set 2: 45 lb × 10

Set 3: 45 lb × 10

EZ Bar Curl

Set 1: 55 lb × 8

Set 2: 75 lb × 8

Set 3: 75 lb × 8

Lying Dumbbell Tricep Extension

Set 1: 70 lb × 8

Set 2: 80 lb × 8

Set 3: 80 lb × 8

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Bodyweight: 197.4 Pounds

Deadlift

Set 1: 135 lb × 10

Set 2: 225 lb × 3

Goblet Squat

Set 1: 15 lb × 8

Stiff Legged Deadlift

Set 1: 135 lb × 8

Set 2: 185 lb × 8

Set 3: 185 lb × 8

Set 4: 185 lb × 8

Seated Leg Curl

Set 1: 115 lb × 8

Friday, September 9, 2016

Bodyweight: 198 Pounds

Close Grip Bench Press

Set 1: 45 lb × 8

Set 2: 95 lb × 8

Set 3: 135 lb × 8

Set 4: 165 lb × 8

Set 5: 185 lb × 7

Set 6: 185 lb × 7

Set 7: 200 lb × 5

Set 8: 185 lb × 7

Chin Up

Set 1: 1 rep

Set 2: 2 reps

Set 3: 3 reps

Set 4: 4 reps

Set 5: 5 reps

Set 6: 6 reps

Set 7: 7 reps

Set 8: 8 reps

Set 9: 9 reps

Bicep Curl (Dumbbell)

Set 1: 60 lb × 8

Set 2: 60 lb × 8

Set 3: 70 lb × 8

Tricep Pushdowns

Set 1: 140 lb × 8

Set 2: 140 lb × 8

Set 3: 140 lb × 8

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